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microsoft_windows:terminalserver:start [2019/03/07 01:54]
127.0.0.1 external edit
microsoft_windows:terminalserver:start [2019/08/10 02:48] (current)
rodolico
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 ====== Using Windows Server as a Terminal Server ====== ====== Using Windows Server as a Terminal Server ======
  
-Some of our clients use Windows Server (in our case, Server 2008r2) as a terminal server. This has many advantages in allowing them to consolodate their usage in one location.+Some of our clients use Windows Server (in our case, Server 2008r2 ​which is getting pretty old) as a terminal server. This has many advantages in allowing them to consolodate their usage in one location.
  
 At a certain level, it is more cost effective. The workstations can be anything laying around, and we don't care how reliable they are. Many of these clients simply purchase a used workstation,​ then make a Remote Desktop (RDP) connection to it. The operating system does not matter much, so long as there is a viable RDP client available on it. Currently, our clients use Mac OSX, Linux, and of course, various types of Windows. If a workstation dies, simply get another one and make the Remote Desktop connection again; your printers, applications and data are all still there. Unix has had this functionality for a long time, but Microsoft realized the need as far back as Windows Server 2003 and our clients have benefited from it. At a certain level, it is more cost effective. The workstations can be anything laying around, and we don't care how reliable they are. Many of these clients simply purchase a used workstation,​ then make a Remote Desktop (RDP) connection to it. The operating system does not matter much, so long as there is a viable RDP client available on it. Currently, our clients use Mac OSX, Linux, and of course, various types of Windows. If a workstation dies, simply get another one and make the Remote Desktop connection again; your printers, applications and data are all still there. Unix has had this functionality for a long time, but Microsoft realized the need as far back as Windows Server 2003 and our clients have benefited from it.
microsoft_windows/terminalserver/start.1551945246.txt.gz ยท Last modified: 2019/03/07 01:54 by 127.0.0.1